Seminar Program

Please choose one of the following courses and make sure it is offered in your desired language. All classes take place at the same time, so it isn't possible to choose more than one.
Click on the heading to see the course description.

ISU Fulda reserves the right to make changes to the course schedule.


Was ist Deutschland: German History, Culture, and Literature from the Kaiserreich to the EU (Weeks 1-4, Language: German )

Hessen: ISU Curricular Outlines

- Minimum requirements-

Was ist Deutschland?

Culture and Communication from 1871 to the present

CLASS HOURS

  • Week 1: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Thursday, 8:30-10:00

Friday & Saturday – 11:00-14:00 (academic immersion program in Berlin)

  • Week 2: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45
  • Week 3: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Thursday, 8:30-10:00

  • Week 4: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Thursday, 8:30-11:45

PROFESSOR

  1. INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES

This seminar is a culture course designed to introduce students with all levels of German proficiency to the period of history in Germany spanning from 1871 to the present. . The course is centered on questions of German identity as they are addressed in art, literature, film, and historical texts created during the historical period studied. The course will focus on the history of the German nation but will also allow students to work creatively through discussions about art and literature and through creative writing activities.

Students will read authentic texts in translation that explore the meaning of German identity and the history of Germany as a nation. The content of the course is designed to examine the question "Was ist Deutschland?" Through readings and written assignments, students will attempt to formulate an answer to that question that has both public and personal relevance. Class time will be devoted primarily to the discussion of reading assignments to which students will respond individually, in small groups, and together as a class. In order to maximize work on reading comprehension, all readings should be done outside of class prior to the session during which they are discussed. Assignments will include readings and discussion questions, web research, and a culminating oral presentation. Most homework assignments and work outside of class will take the form of written responses.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • engage in complex conversations and exchange opinions on the question of German identity from the Kaiserreich to the present;
  • understand and interpret complex written language on a variety of topics by analyzing, summarizing, and discussing authentic texts;
  • present information, concepts, and ideas by participating in group discussions and debates, conducting interviews and presenting information, and creating skits/role-plays;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives of Germany by identifying and describing important aspects and challenges of German and the German experience;
  • reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines and gain insights into German-speaking culture by reading and interpreting authentic texts and examining other cultural products (films, songs, media, etc.);
  • demonstrate an understanding of German-speaking culture by comparing it with their native cultures through the analysis and summarization of authentic texts, films, and cultural practices.

COURSE MATERIALS

Course reader comprised of a variety of authentic texts, works of art, literary selections, and homework assignments.

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

Typically, Monday through Thursday from 8:30 to 11:45 with some variation in schedule based on weekly activities and events. Weekend excursions typically run on Friday and Saturday and emphasize a hands-on experience of German culture.

Date

Time

Topic

Assignments/Assessments/ Additional Practice Materials

Mon

09. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Einstieg– Was ist Deutschland? Stereotypen und kulturelle Vergeliche

Reading from course reader

Web research and questions

Di

10. Jul

8:30-3:00

  • Ausflug Antoniusheim

Mi

11.Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Deutschland und das Kaiserreich
  • Der große Krieg
  • Kunst und Literatur im Krieg

Lesetexte und Internetforschung

Do

12. Jul

8:30-10:00;

  • Die Weimarer Republik und die große Inflation
  • Die politische Landschaft in der Weimarer Republik

Lesetexte und Internetgforschung

Fr

13. Jul

10:00-13:00

  • Nuremberg

Lesetexte

Sa.

14. Jul

10:00-13:00

  • Würzburg

So

15. Jul

10:00-13:00

  • Freizeit

Mo

16. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Die politische Landschaft in der Weimarer Republik Kunst, Literatur und Film in der Weimarer Republik

Internetforschung

Di

17. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Deutschland im Dritten Reich
  • Der Zweite Weltkrieg
  • Präsentationen

Lesetexte

Mi

18. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Deutschland im Dritten Reich
  • Der Zweite Weltkrieg
  • Präsentationen

Lesetexte

Do

19. Jul

  • Berlin

Lesetexte

Fr.

20. Juli

  • Berlin

Sa.

21. Juli

  • Berlin/Dresden

So.

22. Juli

  • Freizeit

Mo

23. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Stunde Null: Deutschland in der Nachkriegszeit

Internetforschung

Di

24. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Deutschland in der Nachkriegszeit
  • Präsentationen

Mi

25. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Deutschland in den 1950ern
  • Das Wirtschaftswunder
  • Präsentationen

Do

26. Jul

8:30-10:00

  • Die Berliner Mauer und das geteilte Land
  • Präsentationen

Fr

27. Jul

  • München

Sa

28. Jul

  • Weimar

So.

29. Jul

  • Freizeit

Mo

30. Jul

8:30-11:45

  • Deutschland in den 1960-1980ern

Internetforschung

Vorbereitung: Präsentationen

Di

1. Aug

8:30-11:45;

  • Deutschland in den 1960-1980ern Mauerfall und Wiedervereinigung
  • Präsentationen
  • Nachmittags: Point Alpha

Prüfungsvorbereitung

Mi

2. Aug

8:30-11:45

  • Mauerfall und Wiedervereinigung
  • Gespräch mit Augenzeuginnen

Prüfungsvorbereitung

Do

3. Aug

8:30-11:45;

  • Wiederholung
  • Examen

Fr

4. Aug

  • Abschlussfeier
  1. INFORMATION ON CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS

ASSIGNMENTS

  • Primarily readings or web research assignments with accompanying short-answer questions. Students will also conduct research on a topic of their choosing about which they will present.

QUIZZES AND EXAMS

Given the scope of material and short duration of the course, students will not do quizzes. They will complete research, conduct a presentation, and write a final exam in addition to daily preparation.

PRACTICE MATERIALS

PowerPoint slides and handouts.

PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

Class discussion is a vital element of this course; it is also a necessary part of the preparation for the homework tasks that will be assigned. Class participation will be evaluated based on level of participation (using a rubric) and attendance in class. Excellent class participation requires thorough and conscientious preparation outside of class. Working with class material outside of class and actively participating in class will help students develop their ability to express opinions, form questions, and develop interpretations about the material we are studying.

MISSED CLASSES

Because students must be present to participate, frequent absences will negatively affect this portion of their grade. A poor grade in class participation (i.e., many absences) can lower the course grade an entire point.

Class Participation Rubric

Name: __________________________ Date: __________________________

Active class participation is important to your skill development and to the success of the course. Your class participation grade is an average of two components: a) your availability to participate (when you are not here, you are not participating), and b) your degree of preparation and participation when you are in class. Your final score will be expressed in percentage form. If you have questions about how to improve your class participation grade, please see your instructor as soon as possible.

  1. A) Availability for Participation

Number of unexcused absences/ Number of days in this period x 100 = % of days missed

________/________ x 100 = ________ (% days missed)

Subtract the % days missed from 100 to get percent attended:

100 - _______= Percent attended

  1. B) Preparation/Participation

90-100

80-90

70-80

60-70

Frequency of participation in class

Student contributes regularly and is extremely engaged in discussion. Student attends all excursions and other arranged activities.

Student initiates a contribution at least once in each recitation and shows intellectual engagement.

Student attends most excursions and other arranged activities.

Student initiates a contribution in half of the recitations and makes attempts at intellectual engagement. Student misses some excursions and other arranged activities.

Student does not initiate contribution & needs instructor to solicit input. Comments are often unrelated to course content. Students frequently misses excursions and other arranged activities.

Quality of comments

Comments always insightful & constructive; uses appropriate terminology. Comments balanced between general impressions, opinions & specific, thoughtful criticisms or contributions.

Comments mostly insightful & constructive; mostly uses appropriate terminology. Occasionally comments are too general or not relevant to the discussion.

Comments are sometimes constructive, with occasional signs of insight. Student does not use appropriate terminology; comments not always relevant to the discussion.

Comments are uninformative, lacking in appropriate terminology. Heavy reliance on the expression of opinion without substantiation.

Listening Skills

Student listens attentively when others present materials, perspectives, as indicated by comments that build on others’ remarks, i.e., student hears what others say & contributes to the dialogue.

Student is mostly attentive when others present ideas, materials, as indicated by comments that reflect & build on others’ remarks. Occasionally needs encouragement or reminder from the instructor.

Student is often inattentive and needs reminder of focus of class. Occasionally makes disruptive comments while others are speaking; looks at cellphone.

Does not listen to others; regularly talks while others speak or does not pay attention while others speak; detracts from discussion; sleeps, frequently looks at cell phone, etc.

Overall Participation Grade:

(A: Percent attended __________ + B: Participation __________)/ 2 = __________%

Comments/suggestions for improvement:

  1. INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

  • The course grade is based on homework, class participation, and a culminating presentation.

Class Participation

35%

Presentation

30%

Exam

35%

Total

100%

Upon successful completion, 3 ECTS will be awarded for the class.

GRADING SCALE:

Percentage

Description

A= 90-100%

1.0

very good: an outstanding achievement

1.3

B= 80-90%

1.7

good: an achievement substantially above average requirements

2.0

2.3

C= 70-80%

2.7

satisfactory: an achievement which corresponds to average requirements

3.0

3.3

D= 60-70%

3.7

sufficient: an achievement which barely meets the requirements

4.0

F= 0-60%

5.0

not sufficient / failed: an achievement which does not meet the requirements

Music Therapy – Sound and Health. The power of music in a changing world (Weeks 1-4, Language: English and German)

Music Therapy – Sound and Health. The power of music in a changing world (Weeks 1-4, Language: English and German)

CLASS HOURS

-Week 1: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Thursday, 8:30-10:00

Friday & Saturday – 11:00-14:00 (academic immersion program in Berlin)

-Week 2: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

-Week 3: Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Thursday, 8:30-10:00

-Week 4:Monday-Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Thursday, 8:30-11:45

PROFESSOR

-Name: Prof.em. Dr. Wolfgang Meyberg

-Office: D 100

-Email: meyberg@gmx.de

1)INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Music therapy is counted among the oldest complementary therapies. The power of music activates human beings, gives them access to their creative resources and lets them experience relief and recovery.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

This course covers a general understanding of the range of application of music therapy. Selected methods of both active and receptive music therapy are discussed and applied in the group with an emphasis on coordination, cooperation and communication. The aims of the methods are then related to individual disease patterns, including the application of music therapy on to autistic children.

COURSE MATERIALS

Introductory material about music therapy (amongst others: Bunt, Leslie (1998), various lecture notes on selected methods of music therapy, videos, DVDs, musical teaching aids and various melody-, sound- and rhythm-oriented instruments.

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

Date

Time

Topic

Reading/ Assignments/ Additional Practice Materials

3.7.-6.7.


Introduction to music therapy and their domains of application, therapy goals, disease patterns, improvisation in context of the group

Textbooks, lecture notes, videos, DVDs, various musical instruments

10.7.-13.7.


Introduction and discussion of selected methods including their theoretical background, fields of application, excursion to Antoniusheim including a musical get-together with members of the wood workshop

See above

17.7.- 20.7..


Focus on autism, methods, goals and reflecting individual musical socialization, sociocultural backgrounds, state of the art in applying music therapy in different countries

See above

24.7.-27.7.


Intermedial methods of music therapy in theory and practice, 2nd get-together with members of the Antoniusheim, music therapy for disabled people, conclusion of the course

See above

2)INFORMATION ON CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS

ASSIGNMENTS

Autonomous work on selected topics (single and teamwork), seminar wrap-up, literature research, internet research

EXAMS

Preparing and presenting three (group-) results in the course of the seminar

PRACTICE MATERIALS

Various musical instruments, materials and tools for painting

PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

Frequent and active participation in the course, willingness to self-reflect, willingness to work in groups/teams

MISSED CLASSES

Frequent unattendence (actions in consultation with the ISU management)

3)INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

Verbal contributions, preparation and wrap-up of individual topics, contributions in context of group work, expertise in self-reflection, sense of self, awareness of other

Upon successful completion, 6 ECTS will be awarded for the class.

According to the rules of ECTS, one credit is equivalent to 25-30 hours student workload.

GRADING SCALE:

Percentage

Grade

Description

90-100%

15 points

1.0

very good: an outstanding achievement

14 points

13 points

1.3

80-90%

12 points

1.7

good: an achievement substantially above average requirements

11 points

2.0

10 points

2.3

70-80%

9 points

2.7

satisfactory: an achievement which corresponds to average requirements

8 points

3.0

7 points

3.3

60-70%

6 points

3.7

sufficient: an achievement which barely meets the requirements

5 points

4.0

0-60%

4 points

5.0

not sufficient / failed: an achievement which does not meet the requirements

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

This course description was issued on: 27.01.2017

Instructor:

Dr. Wolfgang Meyberg is a professor for music at the University of Applied Sciences Fulda. He received his M.A. in Expressive Therapies at Lesley University (Cambridge/USA) and earned his PhD from Oldenburg University (Germany). Dr. Meyberg has many years of experience as music therapist in psychatric hospitals for children and adolescents. His work is strongly influenced by the personal encounter with old healing traditions in West Africa (Ghana), East Asia (South Korea) and North America (USA).

International Health Aspects on Stress Management (Weeks 1 through 4, Language: English)

Hessen: ISU Course Outline

International Perspectives on Stress Management

CLASS HOURS

  • As posted on ISU Fulda website.

PROFESSOR

  • Name: Dr. Ted Coleman
  • Office: n/a

- Office hours: Before and after class, or by appointment

  • Email: drbtc2000@msn.com

- Phone: +49 (0)1573 720 4052

  1. INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This seminar explores causes of stress in every-day life and its impact on various aspects of health. It will address aspects of school, work, finances, interpersonal relationships, communication, life changes, and the larger social and political environment of the 21st century. Techniques for managing stress are emphasized.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

By the end of the seminar, each student will be able to…

  • Define “health” from an ecologic viewpoint;
  • Distinguish among various theories of health and disease.
  • Develop or adopt a functional definition of “stress;”
  • Articulate the phases of the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS);
  • Describe various ways that stress can affect human health;
  • Assess personal responses to stress;
  • Consider benefits of mindful stress management;
  • Demonstrate a range of effective stress management techniques.

COURSE MATERIALS

Greenberg, G.S. Comprehensive Stress Management (10th ed.). Boston: McGraw Hill.

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

TOPIC(s)

09 JULY

Welcome and Orientation; Course Overview

10 JULY

No class – Visit to Antoniusheim

11 JULY

Guidelines for Class Presentations;

Introduction to Service-learning;

Theories of Health and Disease

12 JULY /

Theories of Health and Disease (continued)

16 JULY

Defining and Identifying Stress

17 JULY

Health Effects of Stress

18 JULY

Stress Assessment;

Exam 1

19 JULY

No class – trip to Berlin

23 JULY

Personal Stress Management

24 JULY

Personal Stress Management (continued PRN);

25 JULY

Personal Stress Management (continued PRN);

Guest Speaker: Justyna Staszczak (re: Meditation)

26 JULY /

Preparation for in-class presentation

30 JULY

Communication Skills; Play and Creativity;

31 JULY

In-class Presentations

01 AUGUST

Final Lecture; Course Summation

02 AUGUST

Reports and Reflections on Service-learning; Exam 2

  1. CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS, AND EXAMS

ASSIGNMENTS

Assignments will be designed as follows:

Reflections papers (15 @ 10 points each) 150 points

Exam 1 100 points

In-class Presentation 50 points

Exam 2 100 points

Total 400 points

Each assignment will be discussed in detail and due as scheduled; late assignments are not accepted, and missed assignments may not be made up.

Reflections 09 July – 01 August 150 points

This is a daily structured reflection on the course, each worth 10 points (based on format, writing quality, and a mindful response to each bullet point). While individual responses may vary widely, each reflection should be mindful, professional, and consistent, using these starters:

        • Today I learned or re-learned ….
        • I was surprised ….
        • I’m wondering ….
        • As a result of being here, I will ….

Course Project and In-class Presentation 50 points

Prepare a PowerPoint presentation regarding life in your home country. This may be done individually, or as a group with fellow students from your country. Consider the following topics as you prepare your presentation:

  • Introduction, including your country and your name(s)
  • A map of your country and the area where you live
  • Basic information about your country
    • Population
    • Climate
    • Major industries
    • Average income
    • Average life expectancy
    • Etc.
  • Brief political profile
    • Wars
    • Elections
    • Political turmoil
  • Brief social profile
    • Major social problems
    • Issues or conflicts
    • Brief description of the medical / health system in your country
  • Describe what life is like for people generally in your own town or city.
  • Describe what life is like for you and your friends
    • Sources of stress
    • Available resources
    • Ways you deal with stress.
  • Based on what you have studied in this course, recommend
    • Several ways to reduce or cope with your personal stressors, and
    • Several ways to reduce, cope, or eliminate social or political stressors in your country.

EXAMS

Written Examinations 19 July and 02 August 200 points

Exams will be based on material presented in class, plus additional materials as specified. They will consist of objective (T-F, multiple choice, matching, etc.) and subjective (short answer, essay) items.

No make-up exams, unless specific arrangements are made prior to exam time.

PRACTICE MATERIALS

Course-relevant practice materials will be discussed and modeled in class, with ongoing reflection re: day-to-day application of stress management concepts.

PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

Students are expected to attend each class and participate fully in all activities. Please

        • arrive on time and well prepared;
        • stay for the entire class session;
        • minimize disruption if you must leave class;
        • engage in class discussions when possible and appropriate;
        • dress appropriately;
        • behave professionally;
        • refrain from distracting others;
        • turn off cell phones and other devices.

If you do not understand assignments, readings, etc., it is your responsibility to get clarification as soon as possible. Lack of understanding is not a viable excuse for any assignment submitted late or not meeting expectations.

Cheating or other types of dishonesty such as plagiarism (using someone else’s work as if it were one’s own) will not be tolerated and could result in dismissal from the course and/or the University. Students may not submit work done by someone else or work they have already submitted in another course.

Assignments are due at the beginning of class; late assignments are not accepted, and missed assignments may not be made up.

No make-up exams, unless specific arrangements are made prior to exam time.

MISSED CLASSES

Please see above. There are no “excused” or “unexcused” absences; students are responsible for any material they miss, for whatever reason. There will no “extra credit.”

  1. INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND GRADING SCALE

Grades are based on overall percentage of points earned on assignments and exams.

Very good / Outstanding:

A = 93 – 100%

A- = 90 – 92%

Above average:

B+ = 88 – 89%

B = 83 – 87%

B- = 80 – 82%

Average / Satisfactory:

C+ = 78 – 79%

C = 73 – 77%

C- = 70 – 72%

Below average /
Unsatisfactory:

D+ = 68 – 69%

D = 63 – 67%

D- = 60 – 62%

Failing / No credit earned:

F = Below 60%

Upon successful completion, 6 ECTS will be awarded for the class.
According to the rules of ECTS, one credit is equivalent to 25-30 hours student workload.
This course description was issued on: 13 February 2018

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Cultural, Intercultural, and Social Dimensions of Globalization -- Fundamentals of Intercultural Communication & Migration (Week 4 , Language: English)

Hessen: INTERNATIONAL SUMMER UNIVERSITY(ISU) 2018 Course Outline

Fundamentals of Intercultural Communication and Migration

CLASS HOURS

Mondays –Thursdays:8.30- 11.45

PROFESSOR

Name: Collet Wanjugu Döppner

Email: cwanjugudoeppner@gmail.com - Phone: +49-661-2429799

  1. INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENTS

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Fundamentals of Intercultural Communication and Migration

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • What is culture? Your Culture and the German Culture then and now
  • What is intercultural communication and competence and why do we need it?
  • Migration in Germany at the moment due to the influx of refugees
  • European politics and dealing with migration currently in Europe
  • Look at the main concepts of culture, stereotypes, prejudices, values and migration. Stereotypes of own country and also Germany will be discussed
  • Cultural dimensions and differences- focus on German and participants’ cultures. E.g. Direct and indirect (high and low context) communication and how it influences our environment and the people we interact with.
  • Non verbal communication- Body language e.g. mimic, gestures, proxemics, kinesics, para-verbal communication etc.
  • Universal and cultural body language signals
  • Our cultural values and how they influence us and those we interact with- migrants’ values and how they influence the new culture or are influenced in the new culture
  • Religion and culture(migrants’ and non migrants’ and its impact on society
  • Discuss migration’s impacts on individual, community, and national identities
  1. COURSE MATERIALS

Heringer, Hans Jürgen (2004): Interkulturelle Kommunikation. Tübingen und Bassel. A. Francke Verlag

Gumperz, John (1982): Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hinnenkamp, Volker (1989): Interaktionale Soziolinguistik und Interkulturelle Kommunikation.

Gesprächsmanagement zwischen Deutschen und Türken. Tübingen: Niemeyer.

Handschuck, Sabine/ Schröer Hubertus (2012): Interkulturelle Orientierung und Öffnung. Augsburg:Ziel

Holliday Adrian/ Hyde Martin/ Kullman John (2006): Intercultural Communication- An advanced Resource book. New York: Routledge

Nazarkiewicz, Kirsten/ Krämer Gesa (2012): Handbuch Interkulturelles Coaching. Göttingen:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht GmbH

Nakayama Thomas K./Halualani Rona Tamiko (2013): The Handbook of Critical intercultural Communication. West Sussex: Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Kumbier Dagmar/Schulz von Thun Friedmann( 2013): Interkulturelle Kommunikation: Methoden, Modelle, Beispiele. 2006 Reinbek bei Hamburg:Rowohlt.

Scollon, Ronald. (2012): Intercultural communication : a discourse approach- 3. ed. - Malden [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell

Hofstede, Geert(2010): Cultures and organizations : software of the mind ; intercultural cooperation and its importance for survival . - Rev. and exp. 3. ed. - New York [u.a.] : McGraw-Hill

Jackson, Jane (2012): The Routledge handbook of language and intercultural communication

- London [u.a.] : Routledge

Solimano, Andrés( 2010) :“Why People Move or Stay Put: International Migration Is the result of compelling and Conflicting Factors,” in Solimano, International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization: Historical and Recent Experiences .Cambridge

Harzig, Christiane and Dirk Hoerder with Donna Gabaccia (2009), “The Receiving Society: Economic Insertion, Acculturation, Politics, and New Belongings,” in Harzig, Hoerder, Gabaccia, What is Migration History?  .Polity

Storti,Craig (1994):Cross-Cultural Dialogues- 74 brief encounters with cultural difference. Intercultural Press, Inc.

Harzig. C and Hoerder.D with Gabaccia D.(2009):What is Migration History?.Polity Press, Cambridge and Malden

Berger Mel (1996): Cross- Cultural Team Building: Guidelines for more effective communication and negotiation. Mc Graw-Hill.

Cholewinski R (2005):Irregular migrants: access to minimum social rights. Council of Europe.

Aleksynska. M and Chiswick. B.R.(2011 May):Religiosity and Migration- Travel into One’s Self versus Travel across Cultures. Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit. Institut for the Study of Labor.

Yildirim-Krannig, Yeliz (2014): Kultur zwischen nationalstaaatlichkeit undMigration.Plädoyer für einen Paradigmenwechsel. transcript Verlag,Bielefeld

3 ) TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

  • Description of class schedule as planned

Date

Time

Topic

Reading/ Assignments/ Additional Practice Materials

9.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Introduction. Own Identity and what that means. Get to know each other. What is culture?

Think of more ideas on culture – to be discussed in the next class. Think of and bring typical cultural gestures/signals from their own culture to class the next day. Distribute text for class on 5.7.17. Harzig. C and Hoerder.D with Gabaccia D.(2009):What is Migration History?.Polity Press, Cambridge and Malden

10.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Visit to Antoniusheim

Reader- students will read a text on culture and migration in preparation for the class on 5.7.17

11.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Migration in human history.

Theories of Migration and cultural interaction

After explaining the theories on Migration and culture the students will be required to explain what they understood on the text the teacher distributed on 3.7.17. Discussion.

12.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Culture and migration.

What is migration?

Current topic in Germany and the EU at the moment. How culture is changing due to migration

Introduction to the topic by reading current articles on migration. This will then be discussed in class together with a few intercultural theories on culture change

16.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Dimensions of culture e.g. direct and indirect communication

How culture is changing due to migration

Students will be required to already think about how they communicate and then share in class

17.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Cultural values and how they affect our behaviour and attitudes

We will do an exercise and a little experiment together in class on the topic of values

18.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Migration, and the fight against social exclusion ,racism and xenophobia. Stereotypes , prejudices and how to go about them- theory, practical exercise and discussion

Discussion using text from Cholewinski R (2005):Irregular migrants: access to minimum social rights. Council of Europe.


Through simulation games, the students will get to understand the topic further.

19-21.07.2018

Whole day

Trip to Berlin

Intercultural exercise in Berlin

23.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Film on refugees migrating to Germany. Discuss migration issues in Germany and Europe currently

Discussion on the film and correlation to our class on migration and fundamentals of culture. to our class.

Teacher will summarise text on Migration and culture from: Yildirim-Krannig, Yeliz (2014): Kultur zwischen nationalstaaatlichkeit undMigration.Plädoyer für einen Paradigmenwechsel. transcript Verlag,Bielefeld

24.07.2018

8.30-11.45

Non verbal communication

Cultural differences and whether they still fit in today's world.


Different forms of body language in different cultures will be looked and and through some experiments explained even more deeply.



25.07. 2018

8:30-11:45


Culture shock-Re-entry culture shock


Examples of culture shock among refugees and migrants

Introduction and discussion of the W culture shock curve.

Exercise on culture shock

26.07. 2018

8:30-11:45


Comparison of migration in Germany and in the participants’ countries. Differences, similarities and problems.

Students will be expected to think of migration issues in their countries and will discuss in class and reflect on the current situation.

Students will get a text to read in preparation for the class on 20.07.2017

30.08. 2018

8:30-11:45


Religiosity and Migration.

Culture and conformity and migration

Based on the text: Aleksynska. M and Chiswick. B.R.(2011 May):Religiosity and Migration- Travel into One’s Self versus Travel across Cultures. Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit. Institut for the Study of Labor.

31.08. 2018

8:30-11.45

Simulation games and critical incidences which show cultural conflicts in many cultures including the migration cultures

Students will do an experiment with the teacher that shows how stereotypes and

prejudices are deeply anchored in everyone. Discussion will follow

01.08. 2018

8:30-11:45


Living in another culture (Germany) expectations, cultural dimensions.


Short intercultural movie

Practical intercultural activities and exams

Students will be expected to think of the values discussed in the previous class and imagine what difficulties there are trying to integrate in another culture- examples of refugee problems will be shown and discussed.

Teacher will help participants to prepare for the exams

02.08. 2018

8:30-11:45


Practical intercultural activities and exams


Teacher will help participants to prepare for the exams

  1. INFORMATION ON CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS

ASSIGNMENTS

  • Students will be required to do their own research on themes like what is culture?, Stereotypes and prejudices, cultural dimensions and differences, non verbal signs and communication. The teacher will guide the students on the assignments to be done during the classes.

QUIZZES AND EXAMS

  • Exam on intercultural communication and migration class will include:
  • An intercultural exercise from the students will be done in either alone or groups of up to three.
  • The exercise should be conducted in class and all students should participate.
  • The students should alternate in moderating the exercise i.e. giving instructions on what is to be done, distributing necessary material, checking to see that rules are being followed and that the exercise is going well.
  • At the end of the exercise the students will then ask the group questions on the purpose of the exercise (questions should be prepared before).
  • At the end there will be a summary from the group presenting using themes we had in class like what is culture? Dimensions of culture, stereotypes, cultural values, non verbal communication, etc.
  • Finally, each participant will write a 3-page paper describing the intercultural exercise, its purpose, how the exercise went and summary consisting also of theory from our class and literature..

PRACTICE MATERIALS

  • The teacher will recommend any practice materials once the class has started since it is important to see what the needs of the group are and where the emphasis needs to be. In the library at the University of Applied Sciences in Fulda there are recommended reading materials with practical exercises which fit to the class- teacher will mention this at the beginning of the class.

PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

  • Students will be required to participate actively during the class including group work and discussions. The teacher will always give clear instructions in order to guide the students during the class.

MISSED CLASSES

  • Students are not allowed to miss more than 3 times since the class is only 4 weeks and participation in class accounts for 50% of the total mark.
  1. INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

50%- Participation in class through presence and participating in discussions, team and group exercises and doing the required assignments

  • 50%- Final presentation/practical exercise and written summary.

Upon successful completion, 3 ECTS will be awarded for the class.

According to the rules of ECTS, one credit is equivalent to 25-30 hours student workload.

GRADING SCALE:

  • Description of the grading scale

Percentage

Grade

Description

90-100%

15 points

1.0

very good: an outstanding achievement

14 points

13 points

1.3

80-90%

12 points

1.7

good: an achievement substantially above average requirements

11 points

2.0

10 points

2.3

70-80%

9 points

2.7

satisfactory: an achievement which corresponds to average requirements

8 points

3.0

7 points

3.3

60-70%

6 points

3.7

sufficient: an achievement which barely meets the requirements

5 points

4.0

0-60%

4 points

5.0

not sufficient / failed: an achievement which does not meet the requirements

3 points

2 points

1 point

0 points

This course description was issued on: 08.02.2018